Offence vs. Offense—What Is the Difference?

  • Offence and offense are both correct.
  • Offence is the spelling more commonly used outside of the United States.
  • Offense is the spelling more commonly used in the United States.

Offense is spelled differently based on where you, or your audience, are. But neither offense nor offence are wrong.

Offence vs. Offense—Which Is Correct?

In one sense, offense means an attack. Continue reading “Offence vs. Offense—What Is the Difference?”

Advertisements

Catalog vs. Catalogue

  • Catalogue and catalog are both acceptable spellings.
  • Catalog is most popular in American English.
  • Catalogue is the most common form in other parts of the world.

Some stores compile lists of products you can buy from them. These lists (often in book form) are sometimes accompanied by descriptions and photos of the products. You may see this book described as either a catalog or a catalogue. Continue reading “Catalog vs. Catalogue”

Fulfil vs. Fulfill

  • Fulfil and fulfill are both correct spellings of the same word. It means “to put into effect,” “to achieve,” “to carry out,” or “to realize.”
  • Fulfil is the spelling commonly used in English speaking countries like the UK and Australia.
  • Fulfill is the spelling commonly used in the United States.
  • In Canada, they use both spellings.

Fulfill is one of those words with multiple spellings. Continue reading “Fulfil vs. Fulfill”

Dreamed or Dreamt

Is there a difference between dreamed and dreamt? You might be surprised to find conflicting reports. Some people say that there is no difference. Others say that the two words have different meanings. What’s the real deal?

Dreamt and dreamed are both past tense forms of dream. Dreamt is more common in Britain, while dreamed is more common in other English-speaking countries, including the U.S. Continue reading “Dreamed or Dreamt”

Colour or Color—Which Is Correct?

  • When choosing between color and colour, keep in mind that both spellings are correct.
  • The shorter one, color, is the preferred spelling in the United States.
  • The rest of the English-speaking world uses the longer form, colour.

How do you spell color? You’ll see other writers do it two ways—the one we’ve already used in this sentence, and another one—colour. Continue reading “Colour or Color—Which Is Correct?”